Posts Tagged With: parenting

New Review: Bet on Black

Bet on Black:

African-American Women Celebrate

Fatherhood in the Age of Barak Obama

By Kenrya Rankin Naasel

Genre: Nonfiction, Autobiography, African-American, Anthology

Read my review here: http://katepolicanisreviews.wordpress.com/2014/04/04/bet-on-black-by-kenrya-rankin-naasel/

Synopsis:

Inspired by President Barack Obama’s commitment to encouraging and supporting responsible fathers–he created the President’s Fatherhood and Mentoring Initiative to do just that–Bet on Black: African-American Women Celebrate Fatherhood in the Age of Barack Obama aims to wrestle back the much-maligned image of the Black dad and expose it as something that, while not perfect, is a human, loving presence in the lives of his children. In turns insightful, clever and laugh-out-loud funny, 20 Black women writers share deeply personal stories that prove the stereotypes wrong. More than just love letters, their essays spin truths that examine the positive/complicated/ bittersweet/hilarious/awe-inspiring relationships they share with the fathers in their lives. From the girl whose dad pulled double duty to fill the space left when her mother died, to the woman whose brother has successfully raised six children from behind bars, to the young mother who knew her grandfather truly loved her when he threatened to beat up her boyfriend, the stories in Bet on Black will shift the dialog about what it means to be a Black father in the United States.

Contributors featured in Bet on Black: Keisha-Gaye Anderson, Lakeia Brown, Harriette Cole, Corynne L. Corbett, Hillary Crosley, Michelle Duke, Amber Efé, Rochelle Tillery-Larkin Ford, Ashley Foxx, Maya K. Francis, Chee Gates, Ayren Jackson-Cannady, Stefanie Brown James, Tara Pringle Jefferson, Thaisa Eileen Jones, Yanick Rice Lamb, Karen Good Marable, Chidimma Ozor and Charli Penn.

Kenrya Rankin Naasel Headshot 2_Credit Kea Taylor_Imagine Photography
About the Editor:
There are a million songs, movies and books about mamas, but it’s the rare artist who waxes poetic about Daddy’s ability to help conjure up the mortgage payment each month or take out the garbage on the coldest day of the year. The picture is even bleaker when it comes to Black dads. As a group, they’re characterized as deadbeat, sex-crazed sperm donors who don’t care how many babymamas they leave in their wake. But as a woman raised by a devoted single dad, I know firsthand that there’s more to the story.

It wasn’t until I started my own family that I realized how important it is to share stories like mine, ones that depict Black dads far outpacing the expected as they run toward their children’s futures, Father’s Day ties flapping in the wind. So I created Bet on Black: African-American Women Celebrate Fatherhood in the Age of Barack Obama to wrestle back the much maligned image of the Black dad and expose it as something that, while not perfect, is a human, loving presence in the lives of his children.

Join the conversation and be inspired to thank the fantastic dads in your life.

 

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Seattle author spotlight: Nadia Riell

Seattle author spotlight: Nadia Riell. An Examiner article about a fantastic Seattle writer.

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Whining About Getting My Kids To Read

There’s just too much more that interests them. Even when I cut off all TV and other electronic stimulus, they prefer to do other things. They prefer to write books rather than read them. They have a mountain of books to choose from and I buy more all the time. I can make them listen to me read to them if I force them, or I can bribe them to read with something they want. The second only works temporarily if at all.

Unless.

If there is a book they see and want and I go get it for them, they read it right away. Sometimes they read it over and over again. This happens sporadically and I can’t seem to force it.

I wonder if this might have something to do with the amount of information available to them and an instinctive need to filter it. Does that make sense?

What do you think? Do you have the same issues? What do you do about it?

Categories: Reading | Tags: , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Book review: Inspiring Childhood, Inspiring Life by Nadia Riell

This isn’t one from my list. It is a book newly available by my dear friend! See my review on http://katepolicanisreviews.wordpress.com/2012/01/06/inspiring-childhood-inspiring-life-by-nadia-riell/

Living life whether you’re growing up, already gown up or also in the role of parenting, is certainly not a perfect science. There isn’t a “one size fits all” formula to follow in order to achieve success or happiness, yet most of us want to achieve them.

So begins this intentionally compact collection that mirrors the short conversations and simple words that can inspire our lives, from children to adults. As love, friendship, choices and experiences we face impact our world, they are also thought provoking in how we view the world and see ourselves in it.
Refreshing like a quick hug, smile or a pat on the back, this book offers encouragement and joy for reaching potential through life’s lessons, hopes and dreams.

For more about the author, visit http://nadiariell.com 

…or you could just go buy the book right now!

Inspiring Childhood, Inspiring Life is available in ebook and paperback form:

To buy on Amazon

Smashwords http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/116771

Categories: Reviews | Tags: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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